Dream of the Water Children: The Black Pacific

VIDEO: Eric Robinson of Black Tokyo – Race & Identity in Japan

I am featured, along with Black-Okinawan thinker Mitzi-Uehara Carter, in the latest edition of Black Tokyo‘s Vlog at Youtube.

This edition features issues whiteness, blackness and Japanese-ness in relation to Race and Identity in Japan.

Reflecting on the election of Ariana Miyamoto as Miss Universe Japan in 2015, Eric points to various critiques, insights, and conditions that construct the definitions of social change, Japan and Japanese-ness, and the roles of mixed-race-ness in Japanese society, whether influencing Japan or not.

Also: Visit Eric Robinson’s BLACK TOKYO blog here: http://www.blacktokyo.com 

 

MY BOOK: Update! – ENTIRE PROOF going through!

Mama, Dad, myself, above and below bombs.

My BOOK is, for the FIRST TIME in six years of being in the works with the publisher, is ON TRACK!  

For the first time, the ENTIRE manuscript has been proofed and is being reviewed for final edits and placement of photos.  This has never happened!  So it is going to be ready by next fall!

The many photos need to be placed throughout the book in the right places, the captions need to be cleaned up, and then the Index needs to be done.

While this is going on, those doing extra chapters such as the Introduction, will be able to read the manuscript and write their pieces for the Front Matter.

So it feels GOOD to finally be in the “BOOK IS HAPPENING” stage, and no longer in the start-and-stop phase.

 

Now Showing in Theaters: うまれつき (Born With It)

A Black-Japanese student enters a Japanese school.  The Japanese students are amazed, curious, condescending, afraid, finding ways to make him outcast.

This Short Film, written and directed by Emmanuel Osei-Kuffour, Jr., shines a lens onto a small town, and gives a picture of how Japanese-mix children and people, and black-mixed people and Blacks are treated in Japan.

I was born in Japan and raised there until 1962-3.  Then again, from 1968 to 1970–when I was 13 to 15 years old.  There was a difference in the two periods.

In the 50s and 60s, racism was more overt, physically violent, and widespread– for me and my kind in Japan. In the late 60s, it was more private and more prone to ostracizing and teasing, although physical violence was still a relative normal response. And as we know from news reports and stories of public figures in Japan who are Black-Japanese, it has not changed much in Japan.

The director hoped to shine a light on this persistent problem of Japanese identity and its treatment of “the other.”

 

 

T-Tasha / Yoon-Mi-Rae : Korean Rap/Hip-Hop/R&B QUEEN

Tasha – or Yoon Mi Rae in Korea, alternatively known as “T-Tasha”— is definitely South Korea’s greatest Hip-Hop/Rap/R&B or more accurately: K-R&B artist. Her heritage is African-American/Korean, and is in my other posts and the purpose of this whole blog site, her experiences growing up in Korea were full of the prejudiced, racist violence against her.

Often, these lives produce tremendous artistic expression.

This is a 9-year-old video. She was a teenager and still, you can sense how good she is.

This song seeks to empower Black-Korean girls, recorded live off of Korean television, entitled: Wonder Woman.

I will post more of her videos later.

Enjoy.

Controlling Amerasian Body-Minds: The American and French-Fathered Mixed-Race Children in Japan, Korea and Vietnam

amerasian-vietnam-2015-WshgtnPOST
Photo of Vietnamese Amerasians by Linda Davidson/Washington Post

 

 

For infants and children born to local mothers in Japan and Korea, fathered by U.S. military and civilian personnel during the U.S. occupation of these countries, their lives were not in their own or their mothers’ control. During U.S. occupations in Asia and the Pacific which began earlier—Hawaii, the Philippines, Guam, the Mariana Islands, and the Solomon Islands—the same issues became prevalent, real, a struggle, continuing today.  It continues today because these places are still “occupied.” And then in the latest full-out colonial Cold War played out in Southeast Asia, the same for the children and their mothers. But let us not forget that before the U.S. arrived in Southeast Asia, the French colonized Indochina. They had state policies on how to control the issue of the Metís, as they were called by the French, which differed from the United Statians.

Read more…

Black-Korean Michelle Lee 이미쉘 – Without You – Acoustic Version – Interracial Relations

Young Black-Korean Pop singer Michelle Lee 이미쉘  that I introduced to you with her stunning debut music video of Without You, which boldly speaks back to racism against her, is shown here with a recent Acoustic Version of the same song, and sung in English.

One may not notice, but in both videos, the graffiti on the walls that the little girl is at first fearful of, then protests against, says things like “die monster die” and other epitaphs. In the lyrics, she speaks to both a close relation, and society itself for betraying her, lying to her (I love you), then practicing their violence on her. It’s interesting on some commentaries on some sites, some find this unbelievable.  Believe it.  I also lived this in postwar Japan. It still goes on in Asia: the prejudice against mixed-race people, especially black mixed-race people. Speak back Michelle. I am soooooo moved by her and her beautiful singing.

 

 

MY BOOK: The Layout and Proofs are Going! Yes.

Mother and child - Canton 1920
Mother and child in Canton, China circa 1920.

My book: Dream of the Water Children: Memory and Mourning in the Black Pacific, is slated to be out in late spring 2016, in June.  All is on schedule so far.

We are working on the layout and design right now, including the placement of the photos. I am also editing the Afterword section after the editor worked with it.

The Layout is beautiful!  I thank Gabrielle David and the folks at 2Leaf Press for their very very hard work, their tenacity and dedication.

They walk their talk.  A press dedicated to multicultural literature and education is rare!  I am so happy with our work together, although as usual, it’s not all easy.

Exciting!!

2014 – VIDEO: Korean Hapa Tour – Homelands, New Lands, Healing

hapakorea

In the Fall of 2014, a group of Mixed-Korean Amerasians, mostly adoptees from Mixed-race orphanages in Korea, went on a small tour organized by the tour group Me & Korea, back to Korea, to the orphanages, and to meet Insooni 김인순 — Black-Korean pop-star/diva, who was partially responsible for this event.

 

Read more…

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