Dream of the Water Children: The Black Pacific

Beiging & Dream: Two of my WORKS to be PUBLISHED this year!

 

beiging-of-america-promo

Very Very Happy to Report:  two of my works will be published this year!!  Both are *Definitely* on Track, on Time, and will happen (barring destruction of the publishing house).

In June, I will have a chapter in the anthology of mixed-race people in America, entitled: The Beiging of America: Personal Narratives About Being Mixed Race in the Twenty-First Century. It has some very powerful authors in it, of many racial and national backgrounds, sexual and gender identities, of various generations.

Final proof is being edited as we speak.

Mama and I in front of our house in Albuquerque, 1963.
Mama and I in front of our house in Albuquerque, 1963.

In November, after six long years of creative struggle after turning in my book to the publisher, my long-awaited book: Dream of the Water Children: Memory and Mourning in the Black Pacific, will be released. Yes!

The Final proofs and images are being edited and are being put in after being finalized, and waiting for the Introduction and Afterword to be finalized as well.  After this, there will be a final go-over by the chief editor and myself, and then it will be printed!

To be honest, since my publisher, for both of these works, is a small independent publisher, the marketing and promotion will mostly fall on me.

Please contact me if you can write a REVIEW for publishing in another publication or online site (or know of someone who is interested and can get published), or if you can plan a promotional reading by me (alone or on a panel or in a group), or help out in any other way.

Let me know if you need more info.

 

 

MY BOOK: Update! – ENTIRE PROOF going through!

Mama, Dad, myself, above and below bombs.

My BOOK is, for the FIRST TIME in six years of being in the works with the publisher, is ON TRACK!  

For the first time, the ENTIRE manuscript has been proofed and is being reviewed for final edits and placement of photos.  This has never happened!  So it is going to be ready by next fall!

The many photos need to be placed throughout the book in the right places, the captions need to be cleaned up, and then the Index needs to be done.

While this is going on, those doing extra chapters such as the Introduction, will be able to read the manuscript and write their pieces for the Front Matter.

So it feels GOOD to finally be in the “BOOK IS HAPPENING” stage, and no longer in the start-and-stop phase.

 

Re-Post: Black and White GIs in Military prisons in Postwar Japan: Black Glasses Like Clark Kent

blackglasses-clarkkent

The book by Terese Svoboda, Black Glasses Like Clark Kent (Graywolf Press 2008), tells the personal true story of Svoboda’s journey, beginning with her Uncle who becomes depressed, then takes his own life.

Her uncle served in the US Occupation of Japan, working as a Military Stockade guard.

Read more…

Map of an Onion: Kenji Liu’s exquisite cultural-political, intimate Poetry

map-of-an-onion-cover

Kenji Chienshu Liu‘s latest book of poetry:  Map of an Onion, (published by Inlandia Institute 2016), a recent winner of the U.S. national Hillary Gravendyk Prize,  is an exquisite blend of intimacy, heart, colonial history’s effects, war, displacements and identity. Grief, loss, and rage are not locked into rational categories displaced in a western psychological malaise, but are instead interwoven and particularized in textures of belonging, memory and uncovering, through the vast emptiness of fullness-in-difference, of history and intimately personal worlds, evoked between words and from words.

I highly recommend this for anyone who loves poetry in contexts of understanding and owning the multiple histories through which our personal lives are woven; intricately with others, of the present and times past, and the future.

Vimeo Visual Poems accompanying the Book, at Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/album/3840355 

Leah Silvieus‘s review of Kenji’s book at Hyphen Magazine: http://hyphenmagazine.com/blog/2016/03/“i’ll-look-behind-you-you-arrive”-kenji-c-liu’s-map-onion

 

 

“Babysan” by Bill Hume; and Japan Society Review by Kim Brandt

babysan-cover

 

One of the most interesting and revealing pieces of art and history, as well as what I think to be among the most “valuable” from the U.S.-Allied Occupation of Japan, is Bill Hume’s cartoon book: Babysan: A Private Look at the Japanese Occupation.

A great review of this book can be found at the Japan Society, written by Kim Brandt:

http://aboutjapan.japansociety.org/learning-from-babysan

This book gives a great glimpse into how American soldiers viewed their stay in Japan, as Occupiers, as boys who have left home, as military personnel, who were largely becoming intimate with a “Japan” through their relationships with their own ideas about “Oriental” women and Japanese women themselves. In my own work, I focus much on the more intense violent interactions in order to make points related to uneven relations, nation-building, and the tactics and thinking that create the will, desire, and the unspoken aspects of military occupation and empire-building in our world, whether past or present, and most likely the same building blocks that will be re-created in structural procedures and people’s minds in the future. Babysan looks at these these things in the intimate everyday, through their loneliness, need for affection and sex, and their position as conquerors, as male.

Read more…

Japan Entertainment Magazine Interview

Eye-Ai あいあい 2016年7月号

In the July 2016 issue of Japanese Entertainment Magazine Eye-Ai(あいあい), Eric Robinson, Creative Director of Online Magazine Black Tokyo is interviewed for a second time.

In this issue, I am mentioned and quoted, as well as my book, along with interesting quotes from Ariana Miyamoto, recently crowned Miss Universe Japan, who is Black-Japanese.

Mitzi Uehara Carter, who is a scholar and teacher whose heritage is Black-Okinawan, and who runs the blog: Grits and Sushi, is also mentioned, as well as Enka Singer from Chicago, Jero ジェロ , whose mother is Black-Japanese Amerasian.

Eric Robinson, Mitzi Uehara-Carter and myself presented together at the forum at UC Berkeley in 2011, entitled:  Deployment, Bases, and the US Military in Movement: Imagining Japan and the Self Through Race and Sex.

In this issue, Eric Robinson speaks to how Black Tokyo came to be, and offers thoughts on the importance of Black-Japaneseness being in the Japanese (and global) public eye in the present, where issues of race, gender, and nationalism are important to think into for nations to create a more positive co-existence for diverse citizens in a transnational world.

Eye-Ai(あいあい) 2016年7月号 – Below is the link  (try different browsers if you have trouble viewing it).

The Interview begins on Page 28:

http://digi2.fujisan.co.jp/digital/docnext-viewer/Launcher.html?bid=1376765_sample&dhost=2&mhost=3&view_from=catalog%2Fsample&vt=3&z_cry=0&z_dgmg=978a55962b2fb0721346e018bf034759

Preview by Wendy Cheng, of my upcoming book: Dream of the Water Children

0 - BOOK - COVER - final

 

A Black-Japanese Amerasian reflects on life in the present, with the traces of wars and their aftermaths. 2Leaf Press is pleased to announce the publication of Fredrick D. Kakinami Cloyd’s first book, DREAM OF THE WATER CHILDREN, MEMORY AND MOURNING IN THE BLACK PACIFIC, in June 2016.

CLICK THIS LINK:  http://2leafpress.org/online/preview-dream-of-the-water-children-wendy-cheng/

MY BOOK: The Layout and Proofs are Going! Yes.

Mother and child - Canton 1920
Mother and child in Canton, China circa 1920.

My book: Dream of the Water Children: Memory and Mourning in the Black Pacific, is slated to be out in late spring 2016, in June.  All is on schedule so far.

We are working on the layout and design right now, including the placement of the photos. I am also editing the Afterword section after the editor worked with it.

The Layout is beautiful!  I thank Gabrielle David and the folks at 2Leaf Press for their very very hard work, their tenacity and dedication.

They walk their talk.  A press dedicated to multicultural literature and education is rare!  I am so happy with our work together, although as usual, it’s not all easy.

Exciting!!

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