Dream of the Water Children: The Black Pacific

Stephanie Blandon — Pan-Amerasian Connections: Adoptions

 

Stephanie Blandon, a blooming artist who was born in 1957 in Inchon, Korea, was left on the doorstep of an orphanage and adopted into a Black-American family stationed in Korea, then brought to the United States. Her story resonates across a Pan-Amerasian context, where military bases, orphanages, postwar realities of poverty and devastation and the American military presence, and racism in Korea and the United States, play a part in the ways in which Amerasians will craft their lives. Although each of us (I am Black-Japanese Amerasian from a military brat nuclear family), have different lives and respond differently to our circumstances, there are threads of similiarities in the struggle against racism, sexism, homophobia, nationalism and the tensions between community and individualism

Her story is touching and teaches us many things.  Please visit her beautiful short essay at:

Dear Adoption, I’m Nearly 60 Yet Still the 5 year old Version of Myself 

 

T-Tasha / Yoon-Mi-Rae : Korean Rap/Hip-Hop/R&B QUEEN

Tasha – or Yoon Mi Rae in Korea, alternatively known as “T-Tasha”— is definitely South Korea’s greatest Hip-Hop/Rap/R&B or more accurately: K-R&B artist. Her heritage is African-American/Korean, and is in my other posts and the purpose of this whole blog site, her experiences growing up in Korea were full of the prejudiced, racist violence against her.

Often, these lives produce tremendous artistic expression.

This is a 9-year-old video. She was a teenager and still, you can sense how good she is.

This song seeks to empower Black-Korean girls, recorded live off of Korean television, entitled: Wonder Woman.

I will post more of her videos later.

Enjoy.

Militarized Mama Amerasia – an International Women’s Day Reflection

Mama in our front yard in Albuquerque, New Mexico, circa 1972

Today, according to a few sources, there are an estimated two million Amerasians–children and adults of local women across Asia who have been sired by United Statian military and civilian men and abandoned by the men. If we are to include Ameri-Pacifics–those born in the Pacific and South Seas Islands, the numbers would, of course, be higher. Often, in these stories, the harrowing and rough stories of Amerasians are told, and must be continued to be told. But the stories of the mothers, are backgrounded.

Read more…

ARTICLE: Vintage Japanese Movies about Mixed-Black Japanese

Ningen no Shōmei 人間の証明 Proof of a Human Being (1977) was one of the Postwar Japanese movies that depicted the Black-Japanese mixed race children and the social  impact and effects from their presence in Japan. As movies go, the issue is covered on personal, individual case stories but covering up the social policies Japan created, for mixed-race children and their mothers, especially.

Read more…

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