Dream of the Water Children: The Black Pacific

Mama – Remembering

ママ、本当に感謝していますよ。あの世はこの世より優しいでしょ? さよなら。

I am always remembering. I am always with her.  I have also let her go. She raised and protected me, even midst all that she had been through: bombings by the United States, death and destruction; the depression and devastation of the postwar while the U.S. and allies bulldozed and built the military bases and then ruled the Japanese.  Censorship, fights and relationships with African-American and white men and women of the military; hunting for her sister’s body in Hiroshima that never came to fruition; falling for Americans, meeting my father;  giving birth to me and raising me amidst the mean stares and verbal and physical abuse by Japanese for being the mother of a “love child” and a “mixed-blood” and “black” child.  Experiencing her friends go to jail or commit suicide, go hungry; coming to America, learning to live in American culture, enduring Americans’ prejudice against “Japs,” learning to be herself in America and taking care of herself; being kind, gentle, tough, raging, funny as hell, being wise.

Mizuko and Yokohama Mary

In 2005, a documentary /movie was released named “Yokohama Mary.” It centers on a figure of an elder woman, dressed in a white Western aristocratic-era dress, with a parasol, and high heels, painting her face in white with bright red lips, almost like a Butoh form character, who wandered around the train stations and city streets in Yokohama. She was seen by the Japanese public over and over for about a decade. Then in 1995, she suddenly disappeared from sight.  In Japan, rumors began……….

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Mizuko 水子 – “Water Children”

Jizo statues stand in many places and in many forms around Japan. Photo by Angie Star.

 

The title of my book: Dream of the Water Children: Memory and Mourning in the Black Pacific, contains terms that are in the in-between space between language, history, and worldviews.  In this post, and the next post, I will focus on the term: water children.  What is this?  In my own use of the term for my book, what does this mean?

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Join ‘Japan’s War Brides and Their Legacies – 2018 Symposium’

Japan’s War Brides and Their Legacies: 2018 Symposium — a symposium on the legacies and effects of the lives of women who married non-Japanese between 1945 to 1965, will be coming at USC (University of Southern California) in 2018.

I will be one of the organizers and looking forward to building this into a solid first-time program.

My hope is that healing, learning, connection, and impacts are made, linking the individual and diverse post-war Japanese women’s experiences with the lives of their children and what and how this links with other stories that create spaces for thinking for social change and social justice, and to honor the lives of the Japanese war-brides, which are often mired in controversy and various forms of invisiblizing.

Our intention is to bring Japanese war brides, their children, and the scholars, artists, filmmakers, and the general community together for a series of events for sharing, thinking, healing, and inspiration.

If you are a child of a Japanese post-WWII marriage, or are yourself, and would like to join in bringing this symposium together, please join our facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1849706125309535/

MY BOOK: Update! – ENTIRE PROOF going through!

Mama, Dad, myself, above and below bombs.

My BOOK is, for the FIRST TIME in six years of being in the works with the publisher, is ON TRACK!  

For the first time, the ENTIRE manuscript has been proofed and is being reviewed for final edits and placement of photos.  This has never happened!  So it is going to be ready by next fall!

The many photos need to be placed throughout the book in the right places, the captions need to be cleaned up, and then the Index needs to be done.

While this is going on, those doing extra chapters such as the Introduction, will be able to read the manuscript and write their pieces for the Front Matter.

So it feels GOOD to finally be in the “BOOK IS HAPPENING” stage, and no longer in the start-and-stop phase.

 

Militarized Mama Amerasia – an International Women’s Day Reflection

Mama in our front yard in Albuquerque, New Mexico, circa 1972

Today, according to a few sources, there are an estimated two million Amerasians–children and adults of local women across Asia who have been sired by United Statian military and civilian men and abandoned by the men. If we are to include Ameri-Pacifics–those born in the Pacific and South Seas Islands, the numbers would, of course, be higher. Often, in these stories, the harrowing and rough stories of Amerasians are told, and must be continued to be told. But the stories of the mothers, are backgrounded.

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New Video posted on YouTube: “BLACK PACIFIC ELEGY”

Here is the second installment of my video series.

It is a visual poem.  Read, listen, feel, think.

Hopefully you will be curious, look up information and terms you don’t quite know or understand.

Be outraged?  Become more understanding? Curious?

Watch this in HD for the best view!

If you prefer VIMEO – the same video is here: https://vimeo.com/153967699

Controlling Amerasian Body-Minds: The American and French-Fathered Mixed-Race Children in Japan, Korea and Vietnam

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Photo of Vietnamese Amerasians by Linda Davidson/Washington Post

 

 

For infants and children born to local mothers in Japan and Korea, fathered by U.S. military and civilian personnel during the U.S. occupation of these countries, their lives were not in their own or their mothers’ control. During U.S. occupations in Asia and the Pacific which began earlier—Hawaii, the Philippines, Guam, the Mariana Islands, and the Solomon Islands—the same issues became prevalent, real, a struggle, continuing today.  It continues today because these places are still “occupied.” And then in the latest full-out colonial Cold War played out in Southeast Asia, the same for the children and their mothers. But let us not forget that before the U.S. arrived in Southeast Asia, the French colonized Indochina. They had state policies on how to control the issue of the Metís, as they were called by the French, which differed from the United Statians.

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Podcast: “Violence and Memory” — My Discussion at As(I)Am project

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This is a Podcast from a February 2015 edition of “Drop That Hyphen” at the Project As(I)Am Online Magazine which is a Hub that brings together Asian-American activist-artist-thinkers together to challenge racism, sexism, heterosexism and homophobia, nationalism, class/caste-ism, and other oppressions toward social change.

 

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