Dream of the Water Children: The Black Pacific

Harbors

December 7th.  In any year, in the United States, it is memorialized.

Just what is memorialized?

Memory. . . . . . What is it? Memory of What?  For what?

pearl-harbor-mem-dayOf course.  We mourn. the loss.

Veterans of the U.S. military who were alive at the time, who experienced it, must remember it, perhaps simply to honor their friends and fellow military friends who perished, or whose lives were maimed.—But . . . . . . .

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Map of an Onion: Kenji Liu’s exquisite cultural-political, intimate Poetry

map-of-an-onion-cover

Kenji Chienshu Liu‘s latest book of poetry:  Map of an Onion, (published by Inlandia Institute 2016), a recent winner of the U.S. national Hillary Gravendyk Prize,  is an exquisite blend of intimacy, heart, colonial history’s effects, war, displacements and identity. Grief, loss, and rage are not locked into rational categories displaced in a western psychological malaise, but are instead interwoven and particularized in textures of belonging, memory and uncovering, through the vast emptiness of fullness-in-difference, of history and intimately personal worlds, evoked between words and from words.

I highly recommend this for anyone who loves poetry in contexts of understanding and owning the multiple histories through which our personal lives are woven; intricately with others, of the present and times past, and the future.

Vimeo Visual Poems accompanying the Book, at Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/album/3840355 

Leah Silvieus‘s review of Kenji’s book at Hyphen Magazine: http://hyphenmagazine.com/blog/2016/03/“i’ll-look-behind-you-you-arrive”-kenji-c-liu’s-map-onion

 

 

GENERATION NEXUS – Reflections

 

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The Generation Nexus: Peace in the Post War Era event is ongoing through spring of 2014.  The facilities are beautiful.  Approaching the building, the Golden Gate Bridge, Crissy Field, and the waters can be seen, amidst the beautiful hills that are a huge part of the Presidio area in which the Building 640 has been built.

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Poem by San Francisco-based Blasian Hapa Poet Sabrena Taylor: Hair 2

Kathy Usami, daughter of unknown African American GI., with mother in Japan. Circa 1969. Photo by Colonel Rentmeester. Courtesy of Life.com

San Francisco Bay Area poet Sabrena Taylor, is of African-American, Japanese cultural background, with Native American roots as well.  Her poems traverse historical, political, mythological memory, addressing longing, social justice and healing:

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